'Sexting' is related to teen group sex trend, says study

Wednesday, 21 December 2011 15:31
Print
sexsign112911_optBY ADELE SAMMARCO
NEWJERSEYNEWSROOM.COM

Teens having sex isn't new, but according to researchers, teenagers who engage in group sex is an alarming new trend.

A new study released by Boston University’s School of Public Health warns teen group sex is on the rise, where researchers found as many as 1 in 13 teenage girls surveyed admitted to participating in group sex.

If those statistics aren’t startling enough, a little more than 7 percent of teens ages 14 to 20 interviewed reported having participated in gang rape activities to sharing multiple sex partners at the same time.

Even more disturbing, nearly half said at least one person in the group was not wearing a condom.

The study, published in the Journal of Urban Health: Bulletin of the New York Academy of Medicine, revealed many young women reported to having been coerced into multi-partner sex.

Emily Rothman, an associate professor of community health sciences at Boston University Health Medical Center, conducted the study by polling 328 teenage girls at community or school health clinics in the Boston area.

In a statement issued by Boston University’s Health Medical Center, Rothman said, “The majority of multiple person sex (MPS), experienced girls in this sample reported being pressured, threatened, coerced, or forced to participate in MPS at least once,” and advised, “Given the substantial proportion of girls who reported that their MPS was nonconsensual, additional research to understand more about the perpetrators, and how to prevent this particular form of sexual violence, is warranted.”

Researchers believe there is a connection between easy access to online pornography and multiple sex partners. With the proliferation of porn on the internet and the latest trend among teenagers who sex-text, or what’s commonly referred to as “sexting”, those who send nude pictures of themselves to friends over their smart phones, analysts say sex has become readily accessible to a growing number of teens willing to experiment.

According to the research, subjects who viewed porn in the past month were about five times as likely as those who had steered clear from the X-rated videos to have group sex.

The authors of the study found girls with MPS experience are also more likely to be victims of dating violence, smoke cigarettes or contract sexually transmitted diseases (STDs),


Rothman believes education and open lines of communication in the classroom as well as at home are key factors in combating this astonishing growing trend among young people.

“We need to find out more about how prevalent this is, because we need to get better information into the hands of parents, pediatricians and schools,” Rothman urged saying, “People need to know about what’s happening. And then be prepared to provide education and counseling.”

Rothman points out certain school programs that focus on healthy relationships and sexual activity have been proven to work, however she believes more needs to be done with implementing them into school schedules and budgets, as reported in the Daily News.

“Group sex among youth is an important public health topic that has received very little attention to date,” Rothman said, “It’s time for parents, pediatricians, federal agencies, and community-based organizations to sit up, pay attention, and take notice: group sex is happening, and we need to be prepared to address it.”

The study uncovered the average age of girls’ first MPS experience was 15.6 years old.

Non-profit organizations such as the California-based Operation for Hope Foundation help to raise awareness of these serious issues facing teenagers today and provides helpful resources for parents, teachers and administrators on how to respond to them.

Another site, Advocates for Youth located in Washington, D.C., champions efforts that help young people make informed and responsible decisions about their reproductive and sexual health, focusing its work primarily on young people ages 14 to 25 across the country as well as around the world.

 
Comments (1)
1 Saturday, 24 December 2011 16:24
Brian464
Children will continue to struggle with sexuality as long as society does not allow children to marry other children.

Once puberty occurs, there is a need to become one with another person and if society does not allow marriages, then that child will become one with either drugs, sex with multiple partners or be vulnerable to exploitation since sex is such a powerful force.

The solution is simple; encourage children to find their true love and once found, get married.

Marriage will bring stability to the child and once stable, that child can have a successful and meaningful life.

Right now, society says have fun, go to college, get a job and then during the late 20s or early 30s get married.

The above cultural attitude will produce an epidemic of STDs and divorce and not the happiness and stability all children deserve
yvComment v.1.20.0