George Lucas' 'Red Tails' honors Tuskegee Airmen, breaks new barrier | Movies | NewJerseyNewsroom.com -- Your State. Your News.

newjerseynewsroom.com

Saturday
Dec 20th
  • Login
  • Create an account
    Registration
    *
    *
    *
    *
    *
    REGISTER_REQUIRED
  • Search
  • Local Business Deals

George Lucas' 'Red Tails' honors Tuskegee Airmen, breaks new barrier

tuskegeeAirman012112_optBY BOB HOLT
NEWJERSEYNEWSROOM.COM

African Americans were forbidden from flying in the U.S. military prior to 1940. One year later, in 1941, an all African-American squadron was formed in Alabama known as the Tuskegee Airmen.

Producer/Director George Lucas has spent 23 years trying to tell their story. His new film, "Red Tails," premiered on Friday. The cast is almost entirely African-American.

“The black fighting man has never been elevated to larger-than-life superhero status,” said Aaron McGruder, who co-wrote the film, according to the Washington Post. “We got a black president before we got a black action movie.”

Tuskegee Airmen Inc. explains that Army Air Corps program to train African Americans to fly and maintain combat planes for the military was known as the Tuskegee Experiment. The Tuskegee Airmen had to battle through segregation and racism, and still become one of the most highly respected fighter squadrons in World War II.

The Tuskegee Airmen fought nearly 2,000 missions in Europe, and destroyed or damaged more than 400 enemy aircraft. The fighters earned nearly 100 Distinguished Flying Crosses. And in 1998, President Bill Clinton established the Tuskegee Airmen National Historic Site at Moton Field in Tuskegee, Alabama, to commemorate the Airmen’s efforts.

The Gadsden Times reports that Alabama Gov. Robert Bentley signed a proclamation on Friday honoring the Tuskegee Airmen. Surviving airmen Herbert Carter, 94, and Oscar Gadson, 91, were in the Governor’s office for the signing. Carter flew 77 combat missions. He called Red Tails “outstanding.”

According to the Philadelphia Daily News, producer George Lucas defines Red Tails as an adventure movie for young people. The paper says much of the acting takes place in simulated cockpits. Lucas also has a 90-minute documentary that features surviving aviators, airing on the History Channel.

 
Comments (6)
6 Tuesday, 24 January 2012 11:07
YEYE AKILIMALI FUNUA OLADE
"RED TAILS"SPEAKS TO THE CORRECTING OF BLACK HISTORY IN AMERICA SO WE ARE GLAD THAT WITH A BLACK PRESIDENT IN OFFICE,GOD IS MOVING IN OTHER WAYS TO UPLIFT THE IMAGE OF BLACKS IN AMERICA!
5 Sunday, 22 January 2012 17:14
Carla Kearney
We saw Red Tails yesterday, it is an awesome movie. Lt. Joe Little was my favorite character. It is a must see by all. My dad would be proud to have served during that time in the war, who was a Navy Seabee. God bless all the remaining Tuskegee Airmen, and we thank God for your recent accomodations and awards.
4 Sunday, 22 January 2012 17:12
Carla Kearney
We saw Red Tails yesterday, it is an awesome movie. Lt. Joe Little was my favorite character. It is a must see by all. My dad would be proud to have served during that time in the war, he was a navy SeaBee. God bless all the remaining Tuskegee Airmen, and we thank God for your recent accomodations and awards.
3 Sunday, 22 January 2012 11:45
Melody
This film has everything: humor, pain, honor, patriotism, romance, fear, triumph, excitement, and you will leave feeling absolutely proud! This story needed to be told-and I am so grateful to George Lucas for finally getting to tell it! It is depressingly rare for African Americans to be portrayed with any kind of heroic depth in film, and this is one movie that Everyone can enjoy and learn from. BRAVO!!!
2 Sunday, 22 January 2012 11:37
Still glad
As an african american i was absolutely elated that this movie was given a second chance seeing as the original movie went straight to tv in 1995. But upon seeing Red Tails in the theatre, my husband and I were ready to walk out in five minutes. Its great that this part of history has been retold and brought back to light, but the acting made it unbearable and annoying.
1 Sunday, 22 January 2012 11:28
Carrie Rogers
I loved the movie I am glad it was made for everyone to see and know that every person is equal no matter what color or race I give ti two thumbs up and I will be watching it again. It made me see that my children and myself can do anything we put our minds to. GREAT JOB!

Add your comment

Your name:
Subject:
Comment:

Follow/join us

Twitter: njnewsroom Linked In Group: 2483509