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Sports programming deals will raise your cable TV bill in 2012

That huge money advantage the New York Yankees franchise once had because of the enormous amount of dollars coming from the YES Network over everyone else in baseball no longer exists. Of course as soon as YES Network contacts are done with local MSOs like Cablevision, Time Warner and Comcast, YES can just jack up the price and justify the hike by saying "we are the Yankees." The Yankees franchise will get back to the top of the perch but regional cable networks are demanding a lot of money and are getting it from MSOs.

Time Warner and Comcast don't have to deal with MSOs like Time Warner and Comcast because they have partial ownership of the Mets-SNY channel. But Time Warner will have to deal with Cablevision at some point soon on SNY carriage renewal and that will be a battle of the heavyweights. The cable TV deals that could come between SNY and MSOs may keep the Wilpon family financially afloat in their quest to keep the Mets franchise in the Wilpon-Katz family portfolio.

Sports teams, sports leagues, sports organizations like the International Olympic Committee need more and more money for operating expenses. The easiest place to get that cash today is cable TV. Very few communities are going to build new stadiums and the business community is tapped out for big ticket items (although you would never know that with the corporate love that Dolan's Knicks get). Cable TV is the place where money can be made and no one has put the brakes to rising rates.

The Time Warner-Cablevision battle will go on and there will be a predictable pattern to the talks. Politicians will get involved and pressure the Dolans over at Cablevision to work out a deal with the Time Warner brass to keep sports fans happy. There will be jawboning in public which seems scripted from a wrestling script and eventually both sides will reach an agreement because they are concerned about their customers.

The bills will go up but there will not be a breakdown of real costs to the consumer. There never is. Cable TV socialism has enriched a lot of the world's biggest capitalists, sports owners and athletes. A cable TV channel blackout is no big deal; it is just a part of doing business.

Evan Weiner, the winner of the United States Sports Academy's 2010 Ronald Reagan Media Award, is an author, radio-TV commentator and speaker on "The Politics of Sports Business." His book, "The Business and Politics of Sports, Second Edition" is available at www.bickley.com and Amazon.

ALSO BY EVAN WEINER

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Barry Bonds and Ryan Braun stories cap off bad week for sports journalists

Bernie Fine story shows why Disney's ESPN and 'SportsCenter' are not real journalism

Snowbirds are paying for Miami Marlins' new stadium

Sportswriters and the NBA lockout blame game

Americans dote on sports celebrities like Joe Paterno

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NBA Lockout: Bryant Gumbel is wrong about David Stern being a racist

NFL forcing Vikings stadium deal in Minnesota, or L.A.

NBA lockout and the blame game

Plan to pay NCAA student-athletes in works

Do First Amendment rights exist in sports?

New York and New Jersey done a favor by not getting 2012 Olympics

Another week of sports business tests fan loyalty

Ask Rick Perry about failed Formula 1 racing investment in U.S.

Could Major League Baseball or 'honkball' be coming to the Netherlands?

Tom Brady who? NFL is ignored in Europe

Discarded NFL players continue the fight for health insurance

What do the GOP candidates think of Title IX?

L.A. Vikings news is good for Zygi Wilf in Minnesota



 
Comments (1)
1 Monday, 09 January 2012 15:03
Observer Guy
"The MSO is protected by federal law thanks to President Ronald Reagan's signature in 1984 and can act as a monopoly. The consumer can switch to satellite but generally runs into the same anti-choice problem."

Hey Evan- if there are alternate providers then IT'S NOT A MONOPOLY!

Andthe alternate providers have the same "problem" because the fault lite with the content owners who refuse to allow cable , satellite and telephone video providers to unbundle or sell the networks a la carte.

You may not like the facts but at least get them straight.

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