N.J. Assembly panel approves bill raising mandatory school attendance from age 16 to 18 | State | NewJerseyNewsroom.com -- Your State. Your News.

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N.J. Assembly panel approves bill raising mandatory school attendance from age 16 to 18

graduation060811_optLegislation that would raise New Jersey’s compulsory school attendance age to 18 was approved Thursday by the Assembly Education Committee.

In an effort to reduce New Jersey’s high school dropout rate, the proposal (A-1411) would raise the age requirement for attendance from 16 to 18 years of age. Students who graduate high school before their 18th birthday would be exempt.

“Societal changes and the increasing demands of the labor market continue to place a premium on education,” Assemblywoman Bonnie Watson Coleman (D-Mercer), a sponsor, said. “A person who stops attending school at age 16 will always lack the skills and preparation to successfully compete in the workforce and function in society.

“Requiring students to attend school until they’re 18 will help ensure that students receive an adequate education and are sufficiently prepared to compete in the labor market,” the Assemblywoman said.

High school dropouts are more likely to live in poverty, receive government assistance, become involved in crime and suffer from poor health.

“Quite simply – and quite tragically - too many of our students are being allowed to walk away before they’ve completed their education and built a foundation for their future,” Watson Coleman said. “Futures are being lost under our current law.”

According to reports, nationally, high school dropouts cost between $320 billion and $350 billion annually in lost wages, taxable income, health, welfare and incarceration costs. About a quarter of those who entered high school this year won't earn a diploma, and according to the National Center for Education Statistics, someone who did not complete high school will earn about $630,000 less over their lifetime than someone who has at least a GED.

—TOM HESTER SR., NEWJERSEYNEWSROOM.COM

 
Comments (4)
4 Monday, 06 February 2012 10:31
Mr Drop out
Fuck High School, I say every student should drop out.
3 Friday, 03 February 2012 16:57
leelawalla
As a teacher I am grateful to Assemblywoman Coleman for making this proposal. 16 year olds are not mature enough to make this decision. Two more years of exposure to education can make the difference in enriching the life of the individual, and ultimately enriching the society as a whole.
2 Friday, 03 February 2012 08:56
DianeCee
Reasons children don't fare well in public schools are numerous, and parental involvement is crucial to the success of THEIR children. If children grow up in a home where no one cares, the school authorities have no chance of making a difference. Is there something NJs officials are keeping secret about the kids who can't seem to learn? Are our welfare dollars producing children who are behind the eight ball before birth? Because this is becoming a thorn in the side of the working class, preventative measures need to be taken to ensure the fairness doctrine here in NJ is applicable to all. I suggest a Work for Welfare program so that the inept women who want to enroll in the "cash for babies program" will think twice before being intimate without using birth control. Liberalism created a huge problem in our society and one that I am not going to financially support. It's almost time to close the door on the northeast.
1 Friday, 03 February 2012 08:12
Politicalpony
“Requiring students to attend school until they’re 18 will help ensure that students receive an adequate education and are sufficiently prepared to compete in the labor market,” the Assemblywoman Bonnie Watson Coleman (D-Mercer) said.

Really? Tell me, where is the commonsense in that statement. If a student is simply showing up and not participating, there is a good chance they are being disruptive to the other students that are willing to learn. I see no gain in holding a person hostage in a scool inviroment if they do not want the education. If you think by forcing them to be there they will have a change of mind and attitude, your our of your mind. How the heck do we get these unsound reasoning type people into office?

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